How Much Time Do Truckers Waste At Loading Docks? The FMCSA Wants To Know

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s (DOT) Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is seeking public feedback on driver detention times at loading docks to better understand how it impacts safety on the road.

In a 2011 study conducted by the Government Accountability Office (GAO) which recommended the, “ FMCSA examine the extent to which detention time contributes to hours of service violations in its future studies on driver fatigue and detention time.’’ In response to the GAO report, the FMCSA sponsored a study later conducted that estimated the average detention time a driver spends loading and unloading is, “10 percent of their stops for an average duration of 1.4 hours beyond a commonly accepted two-hour loading and unloading period”. However, the study failed to calculate what normal loading and unloading times should be.

The DOT study hypothesizes that not only does detention time increase fatigue, but may also contribute to dangerous driving behaviors and increased frustration.

The FMCSA is seeking comments on the following questions:

  • Are data currently available that can accurately record loading, unloading, and delay times?
  • Is there technology available that could record and delineate prompt loading and unloading times versus the extended delays sometimes experienced by drivers?
  • How can delay times be captured and recorded in a systematic, comparable manner?
  • Could systematic collection and publication of loading, unloading, and delay times be useful in driver or carrier business decisions and help to reduce loading, unloading, and delay times?
  • What should FMCSA use as an estimate of reasonable loading/unloading time? Please provide a basis for your response.
  • How do contract arrangements between carriers and shippers address acceptable wait times? Do these arrangements include penalties for delays attributable to a carrier or shipper?
  • What actions by FMCSA, within its current statutory authority, would help to reduce loading, unloading, and delay times?

Ezlogz offers geofencing, a feature which allows the admin to set up a barrier to track how long a driver is at a location, which will then notify the admin when they leave the geofenced area. Many of our customers like to use this feature at loading docks. Geofencing is an essential feature every fleet should have to track which loading docks effect your drivers available driving and on-duty time.

The FMCSA stated they need more information on trucker detention time at shippers and receivers in order to understand how those delays impact highway safety. The FMCSA is requesting feedback, there is a 90-day comment period ending on September 9, 2019. If you’d like to leave a comment please follow all guidelines listed here

Source: https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-2019-06-10/pdf/2019-12167.pdf

Read More

Tips to Keep Truck Drivers Safe On The Road

The life of a truck driver isn’t easy and while there’s many ways to stay safe such as seatbelts, speed limits, and planning your trip ahead of time, at Ezlogz we’re focused on your safety. We understand what it’s like to be on the road, after all Ezlogz is made by truckers for truckers. Here are our tips to stay safe:

Ezlogz Dash Cams

One way to stay safe on the road is with dash cams. Dash cams are useful because they provide proof during accidents. They’re also are a great way to prevent fraud and theft. Coming soon, Ezlogz will be offering Dash Cams. It’s an extra layer of protection we believe every driver should have, because our cameras offer live data you’ll never have to worry about what’s going on.

Ezlogz SOS

Within the next month Ezlogz will be releasing a new feature, our SOS button. This will allow any driver who enables SOS to send a driver in distress message to nearby drivers. Ezlogz takes pride in building a platform where drivers can communicate with one another, once the driver enables SOS, dispatch will automatically get notified, the driver in distress also has the option to call 911. It’s another feature Ezlogz provides to keep your drivers safer on the road!

Communication

Communication is key. It’s important to communicate if there’s issues with the load, truck, or shipping docs because it’s better to be safe than end up with a violation or out of service order. If you feel like something’s not right tell your boss or supervisor about it.

As always Ezlogz has 24/7 customer support in more than six languages. Feel free to give us a call anytime at 1(800)670-7807 or email support@ezlogz.com

Read More

2019 Inspection Blitz: What to Expect

The Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) announced that the 2019 International Roadcheck will begin on June 4th and end June 6th. The inspection will be taking place throughout all of North America. During the 72-hour blitz, CMV inspectors will be inspecting both the commercial motor vehicles and the driver.

Most drivers who are inspected will receive the full 37 point North American Standard Level I Inspection. Every year the International Roadcheck focuses on a specific category of violations, this year they’re focusing on steering and suspension systems. According to the CVSA, inspectors may also conduct, “Level II Walk-Around Driver/Vehicle Inspection, Level III Driver/Credential/Administrative Inspection or Level V Vehicle-Only Inspection.” If no violations are found during the inspection a CVSA decal will be applied to the vehicle. The decal indicates the vehicle passed the inspection from a CVSA certified inspector. On the contrary, if there are violations present the CVSA certified inspector may issue the vehicle out of service. The vehicle cannot resume operating until the violations are corrected, the same goes for a driver who is issued out of service.

The International Roadcheck is the biggest enforcement program on CMV’s in the world. The CVSA states that, “around 17 trucks and buses inspected, on average, every minute in Canada, the United States and Mexico during a 72-hour period.” This means during the inspection blitz that roughly 24,480 CMV’s are inspected every 24-hours.

Source: https://cvsa.org/news-entry/2019-roadcheck-dates-focus/

Read More

Transitioning to ELD from AOBRD

On December 16, 2019, any driver still running an AOBRD will be in violation of the electronic logging device (ELD) law. It’s important all users understand the difference between the two so they know what to expect.

An Electronic Logging Device is electronic hardware that’s connected to the OBD port of a commercial motor vehicle (CMV). The ELD records hours of service (HOS), driving time, miles driven, and engine information. Because the ELD is attached to the CMV it doesn’t have to be turned on for it to collect data. However, the user must log on their ELD app to record the correct status such as on duty and off duty, and personal conveyance. An Automatic On-board Recording Device (AOBRD) functions similar to an ELD but AOBRDs allow drivers and fleets the opportunity to correct mistakes on logs. It also displays less information, making corrections less apparent. In comparison, ELDs displays all annotations, and automatically recorded events cannot be edited only annotated by the admin.

If you use Ezlogz, you can switch from AOBRD to ELD with the click of a button. However, with other carriers it may be a more painful process and you might find yourself searching the market for a new FMCSA-compliant ELD.

This is what founder and CEO of Ezlogz, CJ “Sergey” Karman, has to say about the transition from AOBRD to ELD, “Taking into consideration the new HOS law expecting to be published next month, the transition should be smooth, I can see it benefiting the logistics industry.” CJ concluded, “Because Ezlogz is the first ELD provider on blockchain technology, with tamper proof, imputable, and transparent ELD data our customers will be at ease with the process.” We’re anticipating the new HOS law expected next month. Hopefully it will encourage drivers with AOBRD to make the switch sooner than the deadline.

The table below compares how both AOBRD and ELD records data, locations, editing, and driving time. This table summarizes the FMCSA’s comparison chart.

AOBRDELD
What it records:

-Date and Time
-Engine hours
-Vehicle miles
-Drive times
-Locations
-Duty status
-Date and Time
-Engine hours
-Vehicle Miles
-Locations
-Duty status
-Vehicle malfunctions
-Identifying information
on driver, carrier & vehicle
Locations:

-Can be entered
manually
-Recorded at change
of duty status
Automatically records when:
-Engine is turned off or on
-Change in duty status
-60 min intervals while
driving
Editing:

-Records who made an
edit and when
-Automatically recorded
events cannot be edited
only annotated
Driving time:

-Can only be edited
when attributed to
the wrong driver
-Automatically records when
vehicle reaches 5mph
Inspections:

-Not required to print
out logs
-Must transfer data to
officials by web, email, or
bluetooth
-If transfer not available, the
ELD must display or print
out the logs

S

Source: https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/faq/what-are-differences-specs-1988-aobrd-rule-and-eld-rule

Read More